Time Out Rio de Janeiro

Magic Mike

Magic Mike

Date 02 Nov 2012-03 Feb 2013

Opens 2 Nov 2012

Director Steven Soderbergh

Cast Channing Tatum, Matthew McConaughey, Cody McMains

The US filmmaker Steven Soderbergh has been threatening to retire. But no auteur’s career is complete, it now seems, until he has coaxed an Oscar-worthy dry hump out of Channing Tatum. Nor until he’s directed men in trenchcoats doing things to umbrellas that would make Gene Kelly weep. So Soderbergh has made Magic Mike – a fun, throwaway film about male strippers.

The premise alone will be enough to put off some of his fans. Which is a shame, because Soderbergh being Soderbergh, he brings his grungy A-game to the butt ’n’ thrust of male stripping. Tatum stars and is credited as a producer. The idea for the film came from eight months he spent aged 18 working as a stripper. He is Mike, the main attraction in a small-time Florida strip joint.

Each of the club’s artistes has his shtick: Latino stud; hairy biker; David Gandy lookalike; Big Dick Richie… well, you can guess his specialism. Tatum’s Mike is the all-American boy-next-door, starting his routines in a hoodie. By day he works on a building site where he discovers Adam (British actor Alex Pettyfer), who he trains as the club’s hot new act and whose sister (Cody Horn) he falls for. For Mike, stripping is a means to an end – what he really wants is to set up a furniture design business.

Until recently, Tatum was best known for looking no-neck hard in action movies and for the odd lunky romantic lead. Magic Mike should change that. Soderbergh coaxes a sweet, sympathetic performance out of him as a man hitting 30 (virtually washed-up in this game) with the creeping realisation that his life might not be the thrill ride he once believed.

But it’s Matthew McConaughey who steals Magic Mike as the club’s spray-tanned owner, Dallas, who’s convinced he’s the messiah of male stripping. ‘We are the cock rocking kings of Florida,’ he proclaims, hand on leather-clad crotch, with the demonic swagger of a Southern Baptist preacher on the turn.

The dance sequences are hilarious and shamelessly aimed at the girls’- night-out crowd. Admittedly, the script is a little routine and lazy in the Hollywood boy-meets-girl mould. But Soderbergh grasps the campness of this world: backstage you’ll find one guy shaving his legs while another pumps away at his manhood (that’s Joe Manganiello from True Blood as Big Dick Richie – and, no, you don’t get a good look).

And when Adam falls down the rabbit hole with drugs-and-rum types, Soderbergh slips into realism mode (no doubt there will be some fast-forwarding of these bits when the DVD comes out). Now, all we need is for some bright spark to come along with a 3D version. 

Words by Cath Clarke
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